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Infographics

This page contains infographics for sector colleagues, including HR and communications team members to use in their communications at local level. Each of the jpeg files can be saved to your computer.

Pay in HE - 2018 edition

These revised infographics in jpeg format below show pay in higher education in context with the wider UK economy incorporating the latest available pay figures. The first document collects all the infographics on pay together to present a fuller context.

Pay in HE - 2018 edition

jpeg versions of this infographic and its five constituent parts can be found below:

Pay in HE - 2018 edition

Pay - HE teaching professionals and other professional occupations

Comparing teaching professionals' pay

Comparing pay multiples (pay ratios)

Hourly earnings of occupations in HE compared to the wider economy

Measuring HE pay growth in the 21st century

 

Examining the gender pay gap in Higher Education

The aim of these infographics is to explain and examine gender pay gap issues in HE and the two pages cover eight individual infographics which ask key questions and contain images and data to respond accordingly.

This is the second version of UCEA's gender pay gap infographics examining the gender pay gap and updates those published in 2017. These revised and refreshed infographics use information and data from the latest official earnings data published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and HESA data and also draw on joint UCEA and HE trade union sector-level work.

Examining the gender pay gap in Higher Education

The following briefing provides a summary of UCEA’s work at sector-level to examine and understand gender pay gap issues in HE. It explains how the first page of infographics addresses questions to provide context and comparison to gender pay in HE while the second page of infographics provides occupational segregation explanations, Athena SWAN award figures and the gap data within the HE workforce.

UCEA Briefing on HE Gender Pay Gap infographics

jpeg versions of the eight constituent parts can be found below:

What is the difference between equal pay and the gender pay gap?

What is the gender balance in the HE workforce?

Gender pay gap over the decade - how is HE doing?

How does the gender balance differ by job?

What is horizontal segregation?

What is vertical segregation?

How are HEIs advancing women's careers?

Where do we see gender pay gaps within the HE workforce?

 

Income and Expenditure in Higher Education - 2017 edition

 

These revised infographics show the income and expenditure of UK HEIs and make comparisons between different years showing how income sources have changed and borrowing has increased. They also explain why HEIs need to have annual surpluses and give context to the value of the undergraduate student fee in England.

Income and expenditure in Higher Education

Income and expenditure in Higher Education (1)

Income and expenditure in Higher Education (2)

The following are eight individual infographics

Where does the money come from?

What do UK HE institutions spend their money on?

What are student fees really worth?

How do UK HE investment increases in staff and capital expenditure compare?

How do HE institutions maintain and demonstrate financial health

Distribution of surpluses across the sector

Public capital funding for HE institutions in England

Borrowing

 

Employment contracts in Higher Education

The aim of our new infographics are to explain and examine different contracts of employment in HE and the two pages cover eight individual infographics which ask key questions and contain images and data to respond accordingly.  

Employment contracts in Higher Education

jpeg versions of the eight constituent parts can be found below:

In what proportion are different contracts used in HE?

Is the balance changing between fixed and open-ended contracts?

Why are fixed-term contracts used for academic work?

What are 'atypical staff'?

What do atypical academic staff do?

What proportion of HE teaching contracts are atypical?

How is the use of atypical academic contracts changing?

What is the average length of an atypical contract?

 

Pensions - how much do employers spend?

These new infographics show the high costs of employer contributions to the pension schemes provided to staff by HE employers.

Pensions - how much do employers spend?

jpeg versions of the full  series of infographics and the three constituent parts can be found below:

Pensions - how much do employers spend?

Employer contributions to HE pensions

A comparison of pension costs for HE institutions and FTSE 350 companies

UK HE pensions expenditure 2014-15

UK life expectancy - its impact on retirement and pensions

These new infographics demonstrate the improvement in life expectancy in the UK and how this has led to increases in the State Pension Age.

UK life expectancy - its impact on retirement and pensions

jpeg versions of this infographic and its three constituent parts can be found below:

UK life expectancy - its impact on retirement and pensions

Improving life expectancy through the generations

SPA and life spent in retirement

From Baby Boomers to Millennials 2013 we all underestimate life expectancy

 

How HE institutions invest in their staff

These new infographics aim to assist members in getting the message across about the investment made in their staff. The infographics show how staff investment is considerably more than salaries, setting out the employer contributions towards both National Insurance (NI) and high quality pension schemes. These infographics address sector concerns about the pending NI contribution increase at April 2016. This coincides with the contribution increases to USS and SAUL (set 1) or follows public sector scheme increases such as TPS and LGPS (set 2). 

How HE institutions invest in their staff - 1

How HE institutions invest in their staff - 1

How HE institutions invest in their staff - 2

How HE institutions invest in their staff - 2

Jill - USS

Jack - SAUL

Jill - TPS

Jack - LGPS

 

The benefits of working in HE

This new series of infographics show some of the all too often overlooked excellent benefits and conditions available to HE sector employees. The first four documents give overall views on the benefits offered, the other documents break these down by type, for example sickness pay and holiday entitlements.

The benefits of working in HE (full infographic)

Benefits of working in HE (1)

Benefits of working in HE (2)

The benefits of working in HE - campus signpost

The benefits of working in HE - campus signpost

Individual images

Sickness pay entitlement

Family friendly

Holiday entltlement

Employee benefits

Salary exchange

Pensions schemes

Tablet device with benefit apps

  

The rising costs of HE pensions

The infographics in jpeg format below shows the rising costs of HE pensions in the UK and covers issues such as the increases in longevity, the percentage contributions that HE employers make to some of the sector's defined benefit pension schemes and the average annual cost of pension contributions to a large research intensive HE institution.

The rising costs of HE pensions

The following are three individual infographics

Improving longevity

The sources for these longevity facts are the DWP and the ONS.

Employer contributions to defined benefits pensions

Average pensions costs in a large research intensive HE institution

 

Trade union density and support for industrial action

The infographics in jpeg format below show trade union density in higher education and trade union members' support for industrial action. The first document collects four infographics together to present a fuller context.

Trade union density and support for industrial action

The following are four individual infographics

Trade union density in Higher Education

Proportion of staff taking strike action

UCU members' support for strike action

Proportion of academic staff voting for 'action short of a strike' (ASOS)

 

If you have questions about any of the infographics, please contact Andy Fryer or Marc Whittaker

Page last updated 15 June 2018